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Blog: Psychology and Leadership: What Does Your Style Say about You? Part 2

Dec 27

Psychology and Leadership: What Does Your Style Say about You? Part 2


Picture of Gary M JordanIn Part 1 of this five part series on leadership and PST we defined leadership as a reciprocal relationship in which one person points in a direction and others follow.  

Leadership is a very complex skill that is difficult to pin down. Much of the research on leadership has focused on the more obvious traits such as command, decision making, risk-taking, etc. While these definitions capture much of what is widely recognized as leadership in the business and political arenas, it limits leadership to one or two of the PS. Leadership cannot be explained by PS alone, but we believe that a definition that excludes two thirds of people from the possibility of leadership is incomplete. We prefer a very broad definition of the word: Leadership is when one person points in a direction and others follow. The ‘pointing in a direction’ can be overt and specific, or subtle and indistinct. It is not the nature of the direction which determines leadership rather it is the existence of a reciprocal relationship – leader and follower. The development of this reciprocal relationship is not PS dependent; people with any of the six PS can lead. People follow a leader because they recognize either consciously or unconsciously that the leader has certain qualities:

  • Their behaviors build on the natural strengths of their PS.

  • They are aware of the limitations to understanding the world their PS imposes, and they seek to surround themselves and listen to people with PS different than their own.

  • They are aware that any group of followers is composed of people with PS that are different from their own and they find ways to communicate effectively to all PS.

  • They provide opportunities for the diversity within their group of followers to engage and build on complementary skills sets.

  • They learn how to ‘borrow’ successful leadership techniques from the other PS and to use them in a way that puts the stamp of their PS and their unique personality on them.

In the first article we described the first two of the qualities in greater detail. In this article we will look at the last three:

  • They are aware that any group of followers is composed of people with PS that are different from their own and they find ways to communicate effectively to all PS.

    • People receive information differently depending upon their PS. Not only do words and actions mean different things, but the form in which different PS best receive communication is different. For example, Methods receive written communication more effectively than verbal communication while Activities gains the most understanding through verbal interaction. Effective leaders know that to communicate effectively to all PS they must vary the audience size, the actual words they use, and the manner in which they are delivered.

  • They provide opportunities for the diversity within their group of followers to engage and build on complementary skills sets.

Groups of people who work together effectively discover that different members of the group have different skills and talents and that they are most effective when each is engaged in actions that draw upon those skills and talents they are best at doing. Complementary skill sets can augment productivity or they can detract from it. Leaders know how to bring the right people together in teams and groups so that the natural talents and skills of the different members support and build on each other. They also know how create the most effective level of PS diversity within a team so that the differences and level of creative tension is neither too little nor too much.

  • They learn how to ‘borrow’ successful leadership techniques from the other PS and to use them in a way that puts the stamp of their PS and their unique personality on them.

Each PS has a unique set of natural leadership skills that ‘belongs’ to that PS. Leaders study the effective behavior of others and learn how to borrow techniques that are foreign to their style and incorporate them into their own behavior. By ‘borrow’ we are not talking about copying the actions of another PS exactly, which rarely works, but taking the behavior of other PS and putting their own unique stamp on it.

To find out more about the services we have available to help you find the success you want and deserve go to http://www.YourTalentAdvantage.com.

© Vega Behavioral Consulting, Ltd., All Rights Reserved


About Dr. Gary M. Jordan, Ph.D.

Gary Jordan, Ph.D., has over 27 years of experience in clinical psychology, behavioral assessment, individual development, and coaching. He earned his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology – Berkeley.  He is co-creator of Perceptual Style Theory, a revolutionary psychological assessment system that teaches people how to unleash their deepest potentials for success. He’s a partner at Vega Behavioral Consulting, Ltd., a consulting firm that specializes in helping people discover their true skills and talents.  For more information, visit https://www.YourTalentAdvantage.com.

For additional information on Dr. Gary Jordan, please click here



 
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